Tempering chocolate (and filled chocolates)

Okay, so a while back, I found a post on Pinterest that showed how to temper chocolate… and I realized that I had been making it so hard for myself to do it with the method, I was using at that time. Half the times my chocolate wan’t tempered right which resulted in gooey and gray chocolates… ew…

Now, almost every post I have read on how to temper chocolate (and I have read a lot!) are different, because people do what is best for them, so I will show you, how I am tempering my chocolate now.

When making filled chocolates, tempering the chocolate is just soooo important if you want to get that shine and that delicious snap when you bite into it. Untempered or incorrectly tempered chocolate will turn gray-ish and just… not look good.

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I usually temper 200 g at a time, because that gives about 20-25 chocolates. Start off by chopping it all quite fine. That way, it will melt more easily and afterwards put about 2/3 in a heat safe bowl.

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For the next part it is important to have a chocolate/candy thermometer, because this is why it is called “tempering”. It’s all about the right temperatures.

When melting the chocolate, I always though that it had to be done using a double boiler, but because it is all about reaching the right temperature, a microwave is perfectly fine to use as well and this is actually what I use, because honestly, it is so much faster!
But don’t just set the timer for 5 minutes straight. You have to melt the chocolate in small intervals until the right temperature is reached. The ideal temperature for the first stage is between 45 and 50oC (118oF).

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It is important that the chocolate does not exceed the 50oC, since the chocolate will be ruined and you’ll have to either start over with new chocolate or wait for the chocolate to set completely and melt it again…

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Little by little, add some of the unmelted chocolate and stir until you reach the ideal working temperature, which is between 31 and 33oC (90oF) for dark chocolate.
For light chocolate: 28-32 oC
White chocolate: 27-31 oC

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Once this temperature is reached, you are good to go!

Fill a piping bag with the chocolate and fill up the chocolate mold.
Tap the mold on the table a couple of times to get rid of air bubbles and turn the mold upside down to get rid of any excess chocolate. Put it in the fridge for about 5 minutes.

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Fill the chocolate shells with any kind of filling almost all the way to the top, leaving a few millimeters at the top, so you can cover the filling with the final layer of chocolate.
I used a white chocolate-peppermint ganach, which I made by heating 50ml of cream and pouring it over 100g of white chocolate to melt it and added about 6-8 drops of peppermint extract. I simply left it in the fridge over night and it was perfect consistency for piping.

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I don’t have a picture here, but the last step is to cover all the molds up with the remaining chocolate and scrape the excess off with a metal spatula.

Put it back in the fridge for additionally 5 minutes.

With a silicone mold it is easy to pop out the chocolates, but if using a hard polymer mold, this is the ultimate test to see if the chocolate is tempered correctly, because if not, the chocolates will. not. let. go.

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I hope that people will try tempering chocolate, because when you have tried it a couple of times, it is really easy and so much fun! 😀

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